A guide to best practice for LinkedIn

LinkedIn

I’m one of the co-authors of a new guide to best practices for LinkedIn which has been published this week by B2B Marketing. As you might imagine, I’m especially interested in the way that LinkedIn is being used for research by industry analysts and product managers. That’s what my contribution to the guide focusses on, and I have some amazing co-authors including Andy BargeryMark Fones and Rachel Clarke.

In my introduction I explain:

LinkedIn is now a vital tool for understanding changing market needs,
and researchers and product managers are some of LinkedIn’s most
satisfied users.
One of the most important things product managers are looking for is
feedback about products and services, which can be hard to find. In
many markets, product development is an iterative process requiring
small amounts of regular feedback on features, positioning, design and
other detailed questions.
LinkedIn is an invaluable tool when feedback is otherwise hard to find,
for example before products are launched or in niche B2B markets where
traditional market research methods may not work. Without the traditional
opening for field study, LinkedIn is one of the most effective ways to
understand clients’ habits, painpoints and unmet needs.
In this chapter, you’ll find practical guidance on a range of approaches,
from qualitative analysis of discussions and profiles through to questionled
crowd sourcing. These methods allow firms to better understand
client needs and to make small changes earlier, rather than later, in the
development process.
Because the full range of LinkedIn tools is always expanding, this
chapter also outlines how to encourage engagement and feedback
using LinkedIn Polls, Groups and Company pages. These provide further
methods for gathering data early enough to change product plans and
direct research.

The report’s on sale here.

A guide to best practice for LinkedIn
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